Hijablogging and Islamic Fashion

The hijab, one of the most prominent symbols of Islam, is apparently undergoing a modernization. According to a post by Global Voices blogger Jillian C. York, the trend is highly visible online. Blogs dedicated to hijabi fashion and personal experiences of wearing one can be found around the Internet. Below is a video from one so-called hijab blogger, and at the end of this entry, you will find a list of other sites to check out in addition.

Videoblogger Paintyourworld tells the virtual world about how she defines beauty in this entry posted on YouTube:

High fashion is one of the most popular subjects on hijab blogs. Take designer Saouli for instance. She is one of many designers leading the way in modest, yet trendy (and even couture) Islamic dress. Hijablog follows such designers and other hijab fashion trends. In fact, one entry points to a style complete with aviator sunglasses by another innovative designer Nadiah Ramli.

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Are Muslim Women Finding Freedom as Flight Attendants?

From The New York Times article “In Booming Gulf, Some Arab Women Find Freedom in the Skies:”

Far more than other jobs they might find in the gulf, flying makes it difficult for Muslim women to fulfill religious duties like praying five times a day and fasting during Ramadan, the Egyptian attendant noted. She said she hoped to wear the hijab one day, “just not yet.” A sense of disconnection from their religion can add to feelings of alienation from conservative Muslim communities back home. Young women whose work in the gulf supports an extended family often find, to their surprise and chagrin, that work has made them unsuitable for life within that family.

Reactions to the article after the break.

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Muslim Women and the Veil

The debate about Islamic dress such as hijab and head scarfs has fascinated political and fashion publications alike. Popular culture and political magazine Slate published a piece called “Hijab Chic” by Asra Nomani.* Nomani writes about American interpretations of hijab fashion (as does videoblogger Baba Ali and Tariq Ramadan). Her experience at a retail store for so-called “conservative religious women” reveals retailers as reinterpreting the veil to mean an important commercial opportunity. In presenting the view from a non-religious setting (at a fashion show) Nomani points out that in understanding the veil, what is revealed is insight into the people doing the interpreting.

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