Ramadan: An Inside Islam recap


Ramadan Kareem to all our readers! Photo: desertpeace.wordpress.com

Ramadan starts tomorrow, and for the next month, Muslims around the world will be fastingfeasting, and celebrating. Ramadan is also a deeply reflective time as Muslims worldwide count their blessings and develop spiritually.

We have covered Ramadan from various perspectives over the years, and as Inside Islam heads towards a close, it’s a good time to recap some of what we’ve discussed. In fact, Inside Islam is historically linked to Ramadan, as our first very radio show was held during Ramadan, on September 19, 2008.

So here’s a rundown of our coverage of Ramadan over the years. Continue reading

Breaking the Fast: Eid ul-Fitr

Eid ul-Fitr Prayers in Mecca

Eid ul-Fitr Prayers in Mecca

This year’s observation of Ramadan ended on September 20th with the Eid ul-Fitr festivities. Muslims from around the world spent the day celebrating the completion of one of the pillars of Islam. Each year, Ramadan lasts either 29 or 30 days. The beginning and end are determined in different ways. In the United States, for example, the largest Muslim organization, The Islamic Society of North America, uses calculations while many other countries depend on moon sighting. This year, there was relative consensus on Sunday.

The Eid celebrations begin with a morning communal prayer followed by a sermon. The sermon for this holiday typically revolves around fasting and the consequent spiritual growth. Because of the diversity of the Muslim worldwide community, Eid festivities are colored by cultural traditions that are most obvious after the prayer and sermon are completed. Continue reading

Ramadan Commercialized?

252688165_52cd9b3dbfAround August 22nd, Ramadan will begin. Ramadan,  as I mentioned in an earlier post, is supposed to be a month of fasting, increased reading of the Qur’an, and prayer. In the 20th century, the spirit of Ramadan has taken a different turn in parts of the Muslim world, where commercialism has tapped into the financial potential of the month. This aspect of Ramadan is most obvious in the Middle East where for many Ramadan has become a month of feasting, increased shopping, and parties! In the United States, while there are some companies such as Hallmark which are starting to make greeting cards for Ramadan and Eid ul-Fitr (the holiday marking the end of Ramadan), Ramadan has yet to be as commercialized as Christmas.  Continue reading

What about Eid?

On eid-stamp-picutre3June 30th, 2009, the New York City Council passed a resolution to add the Muslim holidays–Eid ul-Fitr and Eid ul-Adha–to the public schools’ holiday calendar. Both of these holidays are significant for Muslims worldwide as the first marks the end of Ramadan,the holy month of fasting, and the second marks the end of the Hajj, the pilgrimage to Mecca. With Ramadan coming right around the corner, the last week in August, I can’t help but remember my own struggles growing up when I would miss school to celebrate these holidays with my family and friends. Many times, exams, group activities, presentations would be scheduled on one (sometimes both) of the two holidays and I would then have to reschedule or simply miss out on something important at school. This resolution would relieve many Muslim American students from having to make that difficult decision.

Continue reading