An Ideal Husband?

efgThe question of marriage outside of one’s faith is not specific to any one religion. Each religion, I am sure, encourages adherents to marry within the faith. Yet while this is true across faiths, and even cultures, Islam is often singled out in a negative light. It seems that there are many who are willing to listen to critiques of Islam that show it to be backwards, oppressive, and intolerant without considering the viewpoints of the adherents and without considering its history and diversity. As a case in point, I want to focus on the issue of marriage in Islam, specifically on Asra Nomani’s article “My Big Fat Muslim Wedding” in Marie Claire, G. Willow Wilson’s response, and the recent Doha Debate on whether a Muslim woman should be allowed to marry anyone she chooses, in which Nomani appeared. Continue reading

Asra Nomani: “A Bad Girl of Islam”

Upcoming Documentary A Mosque in Morgantown

Upcoming Documentary A Mosque in Morgantown

The Washington Post’s “On Faith” blog recently posted video of a two-part conversation with Asra Nomani, journalist, Muslim activist, and feminist. She is also part of the upcoming documentary The Mosque In Morgantown about a Muslim community in West Virginia.

“On Faith” hosts the blog of another prominent Muslim-American voice, the founder of the Interfaith Youth Core Eboo Patel who is a regular contributor to the site. His entries can be found on “The Faith Divide.”

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Muslim Women and the Veil

The debate about Islamic dress such as hijab and head scarfs has fascinated political and fashion publications alike. Popular culture and political magazine Slate published a piece called “Hijab Chic” by Asra Nomani.* Nomani writes about American interpretations of hijab fashion (as does videoblogger Baba Ali and Tariq Ramadan). Her experience at a retail store for so-called “conservative religious women” reveals retailers as reinterpreting the veil to mean an important commercial opportunity. In presenting the view from a non-religious setting (at a fashion show) Nomani points out that in understanding the veil, what is revealed is insight into the people doing the interpreting.

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