I Speak for Myself: American Women on Being Muslim

This Thursday, May 5th, Inside Islam hosts I Speak for Myself: American Women on Being Muslim on the UW-Madison campus. As part of a national book tour, co-editor Zahra Suratwala and contributors Amany Ezeldin, Mariam Sobh, and Zainab Alwan will speak about their experiences growing up in American society, as women of color and as Muslims. The talk will highlight the daily challenges that many women face in both public and private spheres. Human rights, Islamic fashion, and faith will also be discussed, followed by a Q&A and book signing. Amany Ezeldin will also participate in an Inside Islam radio show in Madison before the talk.

When: Thursday, May 5th @ 5:00 pm

Where: Gale VandeBerg Auditorium, Pyle Center, 702 Langdon Street, Madison, Wisconsin

Sponsors: Inside Islam: Dialogues and Debates, the UW-Madison international and area studies centers, and Wisconsin Public Radio.

Free and open to the public.

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The Muslim Brotherhood

In the wake of the pro-democracy protests in Tahrir Square, many Western observers are dismayed by the electoral success of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt. Dr. Tariq Ramadan, grandson of the founder of the Muslim Brotherhood, joins us to talk about what the Brotherhood’s leadership means for the future of Egyptian democracy.

Regions & Themes


Senegal: Conversation in a University

In January 2009, several UW-Madison professors visited Senegal, where a Muslim majority and a Christian minority peacefully coexist. The group stopped at Gaston Berger University in Saint Louis where they talked to Senegalese friends about the country’s religious tolerance.

In the first video clip below, three Senegalese professors explain to the UW-Madison group several reasons for the peaceful relations between the country’s religions. First, there is the culture of Teranga or hospitality, a deeply engrained Senegalese value taught at home and in school, said Badara Sall, one of the Senegalese professors who teaches English at the university. When you encounter a person who doesn’t share your religious belief, added Khadidiatou Diallo, another English professor, you don’t see that person as an enemy, but as a brother who at least shares the same culture. Continue reading